Local Customer Service

Are you getting the treatment you deserve?

Service Excellence Quotes June 1, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — sdullinger @ 7:15 am

Do what you do so well that they will want to see it again and bring their friends.

-Walt Disney

Always do more than is required of you.

-George S. Patton

Only a life lived in the service to others is worth living.

Albert Einstein

It is not fair to ask of others what you are not willing to do yourself.

-Eleanor Roosevelt

The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of other.

Mahatma Ghandi

Well done is better than well said.

-Benjamin Franklin

Why wait to be memorable?

-Tony Robbins

There is place in the world for any business that takes care of its customers – after the sale.

Harvey MacKay

Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.

-Steve Jobs

Customers will want to talk to you if they believe you can solve their problems.

-Jeffrey Gitomer

There are no traffic jams along the extra mile.

-Roger Staubach

A customer is the most important visitor on our premises. He is not dependent on us – we are dependent on him.

-Unknown

 

 

 

Thanks for reading

 

 

 

Celebrate the Win! May 31, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — sdullinger @ 8:03 am

Celebrate the Win!.

 

Celebrate the Win!

Filed under: Uncategorized — sdullinger @ 8:02 am

How often have you listened to a friend or family member rave about the exceptional service they received?  Hardly ever, right? 

How many times of you listened to your friends and family rant about how awful they were treated?  More than you can remember?

It’s only natural for us (the customer) to respond hastily when we feel we have been wronged.  And when finally, we get the treatment we deserve we’re just as quick to dismiss it as, “They are just doing their job”, or, “that’s what they get paid for”.

Business owners and managers are encouraged to celebrate the wins, no matter how little.  Catch an employee doing the right thing and make a big deal about it, let everyone know. 

We (customers) should adopt a similar mindset. 

Thank him/her on the spot in front of their co-workers and other customers.  If you have the time, ask to speak with a manager and offer up your sincere appreciation for the employee.  Call someone as your walking back to your car and tell them the story.  When you get home, (none of us use our smart phones while driving), put your story on Facebook tell all your friends at once.  Go online to send an email directly to the businesses hire ups.  Go to localcustomerservice.wordpress.com 🙂 and leave your story for everyone to see.

An employee who provided you with outstanding service probably does it consistently throughout his/her day.  Acknowledgement from a customer can go far and encourage the employee to maintain and even possibly step his service up another notch, then providing an even more outstanding experience for the customers still to come.

So don’t forget to celebrate the Win!

 

Emotions in Customer Service May 30, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — sdullinger @ 6:38 pm

Emotions in Customer Service.

 

Emotions in Customer Service

Filed under: Uncategorized — sdullinger @ 6:37 pm

There are varying levels of Customer Service across a wide range of industries and markets.  The two steps below can be applied to any industry in any situation involving a customer and an employee.  Regardless of what takes place during the time between; either one of the following moments can cause the business to lose or gain a customer for life.

Acknowledgement

The first step in providing Excellent Customer Service is for the business to recognize the customer AND make some kind of contact to ensure s/he knows they have been noticed.

Acknowledgement can be done in different ways including verbal; “Hi/Hello.”, “How are you today.” and non-verbal; eye contact with a smile, a head nod, or a simple wave of the hand.  Any of these can instantly allow the customer a  sense of recognition.

Customers are typically impatient, however, if they have been properly acknowledged and all visible employees appear to be working, their anxiety levels will stay a minimum.  For a short period of time.

On the other hand, being flat-out ignored is deeply frustrating. It can and will lead the customer to loudly voice his/her opinions or simply leave and share the experience with friends and family.

Appreciation

Equally important to the customer is feeling appreciated for their business.  Customers have options and sometimes those options are closer and more convenient.  It is vital that businesses and their employees recognize and thank the customer for choosing them.

This cannot be the mindless, heartless, “Thank you, come again” offered by someone with the feelings of an ATM.  The customer gets the same emotional contact from the ‘Thank You’ printed on the sign by the door and on the plastic bags that fill up the back seat.

The key to appreciation is sincerity.  Employees should look the customer in the eye and say out loud.  “Thank you.  I appreciate you coming in today.”  Sounds simple, but so many find it difficult to say with any real emotional connection.

Think about it next time you hear a sales person or waitress say ‘Thank you’.  Do you think he/she meant it?  Do you feel appreciated?

 

What Do We Expect? May 29, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — sdullinger @ 3:47 pm

We all have different expectations of Customer Service.  Most of us probably don’t realize our expectations change depending on the business establishment we’re visiting.  What kind of service are we looking for at the grocery store?  Meat & produce need to be fresh.  Don’t make me wait in line for twenty minutes, while employees stand around talking about the weekend.  And you better not put my six-pack of Shipyard in the same bag with my bread.

Do we care if no one said, “Hello welcome to Hannaford”?  No.  Do we care that no one asked us if we know how to properly cook that fine-cut of meat?  No.  Does it bother us when no one asked if we have everything to finish our meal?  No.

How does our way of thinking change when we’re shopping one of the big-box home improvement stores, orange or blue, doesn’t matter.  We want to be greeted, and quickly.  We want the employees to acknowledge that we have chosen, orange over blue, or, blue over orange.  We want someone to offer us assistance, even if we don’t need it.  This is an area of concern right now, as some stores have become overbearing with offering assistance.  But that’s a post for another day.  After accepting assistance we expect the employee to know absolutely everything there is to know about the department they happened to find us in.  They better ask us all the right questions and make sure we leave with every last item we need to complete our project.  If the project fails or something is forgotten and we have to come back to the store, it was the employee’s fault and there will be hell to pay.  Well, maybe not hell but we certainly deserve a discount.  Right?

It isn’t uncommon for Wal-Mart to receive decent Customer Service scores.  How is that possible?  It’s possible because our expectations for Wal-Mart are typically low.  What services do we want from Wal-Mart?  “Welcome to Wal-Mart” greet when we walk in the front door.  A reasonable amount of wait time at check out.  And a smiley face sticker for our kids when we leave.  With expectations this low it’s easy for the customer to say; Yes, I was satisfied with my visit today.

So, the next time you visit a specialty retailer; Home Depot, Lowes, Best Buy, Sears, or any other business where you expect better than good service.  Recognize that your expectations of the company and it’s employees may become elevated, as they should if you are making a major purchase, computer or lawn mower, vs. a pair of socks or a dozen eggs.

Do yourself a favor, keep your expectations realistic, allow yourself a satisfying opportunity to experience Customer Service.

 

Finding the Courage for “Wow” May 26, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — sdullinger @ 1:29 pm

Finding the Courage for “Wow”.